Multiple sets of multiples

Written by Carissa Mason, with input from Shaie O’Brien, Australian Twin Registry

New South Wales mum Caromy McLean was still breastfeeding her first set of twins when she found out she was pregnant with a second set. “I had four in nappies for a year”, Caromy says.

MORE >> Are you ready for twins again?

The uniqueness of twins is important when it comes to finding out about our health

Written by Jenny Boadle from the Twins Research Australia and published in the AMBA Magazine
October 2017

It is often the similarities of twins that draw attention and interest from people. But for health and medical experts it is the differences between twins in a pair that are the most fascinating. This is because they offer important clues about how our genes and environment contribute to our health and wellbeing.

MORE >> Twins inform community health

Insights into unusual and atypical twins

Written by Assoc Prof Mark Umstad, AMBA Patron, and published in the AMBA Magazine
October 2017

For a century, it has been thought that dizygotic twins result from the fertilisation of two separate eggs by two separate sperm, and monozygotic twins form when a single egg is fertilised by a single sperm then subsequently divides to form two embryos.

MORE >> Traditional and new models of twinning

How genes are expressed differently without changes to DNA

Written by Assoc Prof Mark Umstad, Obstetrician & Gynaecologist, and AMBA Patron

Classic twin studies compare similarities between monozygotic (identical) and dizygotic (fraternal) twins. For any condition in which monozygotic twins are more similar than dizygotic twins, there is an implication that there is a more significant genetic than environmental influence. Because twins share many aspects of their environment including the uterus, parents, home and schooling, differences can be assessed in relation to how similar their genes are. In recent years, it has been recognised that there is more to this “nature versus nurture” concept. This is where epigenetics has developed.

MORE >> Epigenetics and twins

Genetic testing doubly important for twins

Written by the Australian Twin Registry and published in the AMBA Magazine
September 2015

A recent study found that nearly a third of twins were incorrect when asked to identify if they were identical or not. Why does it matter and how can you find out for sure? “Are they identical or not?” is usually the first question asked of new parents about their twins. While it may be a matter of curiosity for most parents, for others it has become lifesaving knowledge.

MORE >> Identical or not?

A multiple pregnancy is usually a contraindication to a VBAC 

Written by Assoc Prof Mark Umstad, AMBA Patron, and published in the AMBA Magazine

The rate of caesarean section has steadily increased in Australia over the past few decades. The caesarean section rate is now around 30% for singleton pregnancies, around 70% for twin pregnancies and virtually 100% for triplet and higher order multiple pregnancies.

MORE >> Vaginal birth after caesarean section

Twins raised apart - what the research tells us

Written by the Australian Twin Registry and published in the AMBA Magazine
September 2015

Leading American twin researcher and author Dr Nancy L. Segal visited Australia as a guest of the Australian Twin Registry. She explains how she came to devote her life to studying twins, especially twins raised apart, and some of her latest findings.

MORE >> Twins raised apart